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20121226
20121226
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thought, that is such a poetic thing. the city had burned down 16 times by an arsonist. and i thought, who is this that? so basically i am a true crime writer. and then i found out one of these firemen, it was tom sawyer robinson, i think it is, that he had run with the very first volunteer fire department in california. back in new york where tom was a torch boy, he had been in competition with broderick. when he came west to make his fortune, he basically wanted to be a senator. tom came along and an assortment of the weirdest guys you ever saw -- heavyweight champs, gunslingers, con men, absolutely amazing people. and we are very close to it. that tom sawyer actually met him in may of 19 -- 1863. mark twain like to talk to tom because tom knew great stories. all these little little bits and pieces and stories, that is how long it took, 15 years. can you imagine? i do love it. it is so fun. i guess i could read you some now if you would like. this may take a second. i have never read in public before. so i will start with a quote from tom sawyer. here it is. if you want to know how to i
and join the peace corps, volunteered in the inner city or in outer space because he asked them to give back to this country that has given us all so much. generation inspired has passed that commitment on to their children and grandchildren in the continuity of spirit that continues to work for a more just and peaceful world. as we approached the 50th anniversary, my family thought a good deal about how to best celebrate my father service and patriotism. we recognize that his time is becoming part of history. not living memory. that brings opportunities as well as challenges. both my parents loved history and and they pass it on to me to my brother, john. my father read voraciously about the civil war, english parliamentary history and the world wars of the 20th century. my mother preferred the ancient world in 18th century europe. for them come in the past was not a tie and a welfare. but full of exciting people, rate heroes and heroines, and defense that could teach us a great deal about our own times. here at the library we decided to concentrate on making history of the kennedy adm
, the first lady's great-grandmother who traveled to four cities, she was a sharecropper's daughter born in 1879 and somewhere along the way she decided she did not want anything to do with the farming life and she was one of the first of michele obama's and sisters to set site on chicago in 1908. this is her husband who was a minister who also lived in chicago. this is the first lady's great great grandmother, and she arrived in illinois some time in the 1860s. the first lady describes herself as a south side girl but the family had no idea their roots in illinois go that far back. if you look at mary, you will understand why the family story says she was part cherokee. she obviously has a mixed lineage but i was never able to establish for sure whether that was true. this is the first lady's grandfather, a mislabeled slide, who left south carolina and arrive in chicago around 1931. this is millvinia, the owner of millvinia's brother. this is a photo, this is an amazing coat, there is a nice story behind this one. after the book was published and after an article about the book came out
of supervisors of the mayor or the city attorney are somebody and see what his job was like. and what a good thing that was. i remember that. and one of the reasons, architecture that i was in china, but one of the things i thought was great in architecture is in australia, they have changed now, but they built a parliament. and this parliament, whatever architecture reason, it goes up like this. it's huge, and the building goes down almost to the ground and it's covered with grass, the whole ceiling. so what the children, would come in droves in the buses and they would go to the top and they would go down like that. and i thought what a good idea. the association in their mind will be this democratic government of australia, and it has a place where i can go and roll downhill, so they'll have a positive association and it will make you more interested and they will learn about it. so i'm just pointing out there is no single technique, but ultimately it does depend on building the support for this idea. which means explain, which debating, which means discussing, which means the press event
in confederate ports. the union had chanced the bombardment of the city of vicksburg, and new orleans had fallen. the tennessee, cumberland, and mississippi rivers seem to belong the north, not the south. and it must have seemed for a time in 1862 that this combination of events, particularly the naval successes for the union, were about to end the war between the states. and then the trend line changed. the father of water that lincoln boasted now flowed unvexed to the sea, became vexed all over again. so jim, let's start with you. what happened and why? >> well, the union navy was on a roll in the fall and winter of '61 and '62 and the spring of 1862. and it looked like they were going to open up the mississippi river completely in the summer of 1862. vicksburg was really the only confederate bastion still on the mississippi river, and both the sea-going fleet under, now-admiral david farrogot came up from the gulf of mexico to vicksburg and the so-called we were flotilla of river boats fought down the mississippi, capturing memphis on the way and a number of other places as well, and they com
, genes, experience and a new city private school, and how they related to you and to marty. could you tell that story? >> this is in the 70s. my child, i called him lively. is teachers called him hyperactive. [laughter] and i could expect a call once a month to tell me about my child latest escapade, to come down to see the teacher or the school psychologist, or the principle. and one day when i was particularly weary of sitting in my office, and i said this child has two parents. please alternate calls. [laughter] and it's his father's turn. [laughter] well, marty went down and went to the school, and he faced three stone faces. and what was james' crime? your son stole the elevator. marty's response was, how far could he take it? [laughter] i don't know if it was marty's humor, but as you said, when the school had to alternate calls, calls came once a semester and there was no great improvement in my young son's behavior. but i think people were much more reluctant to call a man away from his work than a woman. >> so you obviously are conscious of your special role as a woman on the
the others on the approach of this administration to our city interests? >> let me say that, you know, china is a bit far, but russia has interests in syria. you know, the way the russians see it is they've already suffered a steadfast with this overthrow of gadhafi and we were still closer to moscow at the time and much closer than to the united states. syria -- russia cannot be happy about the possible loss of another ally in the middle east. russia has a certain degree of interest in a naval base. you know, it's perch in the mediterranean and more importantly, russia knows and putin knows the central asia is park currently a powder keg that gets much less news than it deserves, and you thought the arab spring was tumultuous and occasionally violent, you were going to love central asia because central asia didn't have the european liberalizing effect on the intellectual like the arab world which is a proximate to europe. it had its intelligence the a completely polarized by stalin and i can go on and on. central asia could be a tinderbox and the last thing that russia wants to see is an is
and there are no protestants on the supreme court. there are representatives of the four new york city boroughs on the supreme court from the bronx ginsburg and elena kagan is from manhattan. they are on the supreme court so anyway those are some facts about the supreme court that i hope are interesting. care is a fact of the supreme court that it's important. there are five republicans and four democrats. the supreme court to me any way is most important as a political institution that render is largely political judgments about the issues that come before it. i don't say that as criticism. i often in forums like this just why do they have to do so much politics? can't they just decided the law clerks when they decide questions like does the constitution protect a woman's right to an abortion? does the university consider race in admissions? those are as much political issues as they are legal issues and if i am most concerned about the court as an ideological and political institutions and that is reflected through the personalities of the justices, but mostly it's reflected through their ideology, and i am
and a very segregated city for the end of his life. this woman said that was his brother. the question of whether or not these connections even if they didn't talk about them, whether they did extend beyond millvinia and dolphus's father. as for this reunion, it was really fascinating. it was millvinia's descendant and descendants of millvinia's the owners lose some came from georgia and drove from alabama. we had a ceremony at clayton county with this monument in honor of millvinia and her life. a kind of exchange stories about what they had known. they looked at each other's photographs, they had a meal together, there is an effort underway in the town where millvinia lived in kingston, georgia, to do some commemorative work. she was in a cemetery, church cemetery, an effort to try to get one and i hear from the shield's family often about when that will happen because they would like to come. i don't know how long this kind of connection and interest will last that they are still interested. >> any more questions? we have just a little bit of time? no time. thank you, rachel. thank
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9